Thursday, January 27, 2011

I don't know which I like better

I never claim to be a photographer.  I just take pictures.  I use a Kodak EasyShare C913, or my phone.

The camera has a dial and one of the settings is "snow".  They are very different, but I can not say which one I prefer.

Dial set to "Snow"

Dial set to "Auto"

13 comments:

  1. I like them, you did good! Great photos!

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  2. Interesting. I've noticed that blue tinge in some of my snow pictures. I don't that there is a "snow" setting on my camera, though.

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  3. I like the second one best, because the sky is bluer.
    -- K

    Kay, Alberta, Canada
    An Unfittie's Guide to Adventurous Travel

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  4. I like the first one best..seems brighter. Great pics either way!

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  5. They are both beautiful in each of their own rights.

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  6. Great photos! Winter is way too cold, but it's so photogenic.

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  7. I wonder what would have happened if you had a setting for "beach".

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  8. First one. Definitely. Love the bright sunshine. Great pic!

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  9. 2nd shot, you guys are getting hammered this winter. Stay warm.

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  10. Thanks everyone. If I find something that I want to photo I often take the same picture with different settings. Maybe I should read the manual or something.

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  11. I like the snow settting

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  12. I like the snow setting better because I don't have that setting on my camera and everything that isn't snow comes out very dark, sometime black.

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  13. The "snow" setting is most likely just slightly over-exposing the photo. Here's why:

    A light meter has no idea what you're looking at. So it's calibrated to assume that you're looking at something which reflects 18% of the light, and sets your camera accordingly. This is sometimes called "18% gray".

    When you aim the camera at something black, the light meter thinks "That's supposed to be 18% gray so it must be underexposed," and lets more light in until the black reaches 18% gray. This results in overexposure of the rest of the image. So when you shoot something black, photographers know to underexpose a bit from the meter reading instead of trusting it.

    Similarly, when you photograph a scene with a lot of snow, the camera assumes you're pointing it at something that should be 18% gray, so it underexposes the image until the nice white snow is instead an ugly gray, and the rest of the image is also a bit too dark. Photographers who shoot in the snow know to overexpose a bit from the meter reading so the snow remains white.

    So I assume that the "snow" setting on your camera is simply letting the camera know that what you're shooting is supposed to be white, and not gray, so it should go ahead and overexpose the image a little instead of trusting the light meter.

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